Medical Marijuana

medical marijuanaThere is a difference between medical marijuana and marijuana that is taken in an attempt to get high. The term Medical Marijuana refers to the use of any part of the marijuana plant used to treat a health problem and it is used to obtain relief from symptoms. The majority of legally sold medical marijuana contains the same ingredients as the type used for pleasure, however some varieties of medical marijuana have been grown specially to contain fewer of the chemicals that result in euphoric feelings.

How Does It Work?

The human body already produces chemicals that have a marijuana-like effect affecting inflammation, pain and several other processes. In some cases, marijuana can help make those naturally produced chemicals work more effectively. Medical marijuana can be smoked, vaporized, taken as a liquid extract or eaten in the form of candy or cookies.

What Are The Benefits Of Medical Marijuana?

Although there are some possible health risks of taking marijuana including memory problems and dependency, there are also many benefits of taking marijuana for medical purposes. Some of these benefits include:

Prevention, Regulation And Combating Diseases

Instead of causing diseases, as is believed by many people, in fact studies and recent research has proved that medical marijuana can actually cure a number of physical problems and diseases. Some of the many medical benefits of cannabis include:

  • Fighting glaucoma
  • Preventing the spread of cancer
  • Slowing down the progress of Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Controlling epileptic seizures
  • Easing the pain of MS
  • Reducing the side effects of Hepatitis C
  • Treating IBS
  • Relieving arthritic pain
  • Helping cancer patients going through chemotherapy

Some of the other medical benefits of weed include:

Weight Loss

Marijuana has been proved to regulate the production of insulin, allowing the body to manage its daily intake of calories more efficiently. People who smoke marijuana are therefore often slimmer than those who do not, and this is excellent news for those who are obese.


Depression And Anxiety Relief

Marijuana users find that depression and anxiety can be effectively relieved by taking this drug. A 2010 study performed by Harvard Medical School revealed that this benefit is due to the ability of marijuana to raise the user’s mood thanks to its mild sedative properties.


Safe Alternative To Addiction

Herbs are often safer to take than tobacco and alcohol, not to mention hard drugs, and therefore medical marijuana is a safer alternative to more dangerous addictions which could prove to be lethal.


Improvements In Focus And Mental Creativity

While marijuana does not improve short term memory, it can boost creativity and help users to focus better on the task in hand, allowing the creation of more inventive ideas.


Reversal Of Negative Impacts Of Tobacco Smoking

A 2012 study proved that smoking marijuana has no severe effect on the lungs and can even cancel out the effects of smoking tobacco on a long term basis as long as the user no longer smokes cigarettes. Marijuana can even increase the user’s lung capacity.


Relief Of PTSD

People who are suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder can benefit from the use of marijuana to relieve their symptoms as it is, in fact, the only medication that can relieve the stress involved in PTSD, making this one of the medical cannabis uses that is specifically approved by the Department of Health.


MS Treatment

Taking marijuana in the form of sprays or pills can reduce the muscle spasms and stiffness experienced by Multiple Sclerosis sufferers.


Nerve Damage Treatment

Patients who have damaged nerves, for example through suffering from HIV, can find pain relief from using medical marijuana.


Schizophrenia Treatment

A study carried out in 2012 showed that medical cannabis can treat schizophrenia patients effectively.


Epilepsy Treatment

A study performed by the Virginia Commonwealth University discovered that the ingredients found in marijuana can help to control the spontaneous seizures experienced by epilepsy sufferers.


Slowing of Alzheimer’s Disease

One of cannabis’ active ingredients, tetrahydrocannabinol, can prevent the enzyme acetylcholinesterase from speeding up the formation of Alzheimer’s plaques inside the brain and can even be more effective than traditional drugs in stopping the formation of the protein clumps which inhibit memory and cognition processes.


Appetite Boost

Patients who are being treated for AIDS/HIV often have a low appetite and medical marijuana can increase their desire to eat due to the effect known as “the munchies”.


Stroke Treatment

It has even been shown in a University of Nottingham study that the use of medical marijuana can help to reduce the damage incurred in the brain following a stroke.

Eating, Smoking Or Vaping Marijuana – What Is The Best Way?

ways to consume medical marijuanaWhen consuming marijuana, there are many options to consider. While rolling up a joint and smoking it is the oldest method, vaping is a new trend that is becoming more popular. It is also possible to eat it by including it in a recipe, although some people say that this reduces its medical benefits. There are also tinctures and topical applications which can be used, although these are not as popular as other methods. The majority of people taking medical marijuana smoke it in the form of a joint, however this can produce potentially harmful chemicals. A vaporizer is a high tech, modern device which allows users to vape marijuana, reaping the medicinal benefits without any of the potential harms such as tar and chemicals which are produced when smoking it. A vaporizer allows the plant to be heated by a heating element that increases the temperature up to a controlled level, turning it into a vapor that can be inhaled and this makes it 95% safer than when smoking it.

Legal Medical Marijuana States And DC

Medical marijuana has been legalized for use in 28 states in America. Each has slightly different legislation relating to its usage.

Alaska

Marijuana was approved for medical use in Alaska in 1998 and individuals who can present written documentation from their doctor are permitted to possess an ounce of marijuana to treat any of the following approved conditions:

  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • MS
  • Nausea

Arizona

Since 2010, patients with a doctor’s note can use medical marijuana legally for any of the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • ALS
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe or Chronic Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures and Epilepsy
  • Muscle Spasms/MS
  • PTSD

Arkansas

Arkansas legalized the use of medical marijana in 2016 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • ALS
  • Tourette’s
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • PTSD
  • Athritis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Intractable Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms

California

Since 1996, the use of medical marijuana has been legal in the state of California for those who have a doctor’s letter confirming the benefits of its use for the patient. It can be used to treat:

  • AIDS
  • Anorexia
  • Arthritis
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic Pain
  • Glaucoma
  • Migraine
  • Muscle Spasms
  • Seizures/Epilepsy
  • Nausea
  • Other persistant medical symptoms

Colorado

Medical marijuana was approved for use in 2000 to treat:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cachexia
  • Severe Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms

Connecticut

In 2012, it was made legal to take medical marijuana for:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • MS
  • Spinal Cord Nervous Tissue Damage
  • Intractable Spasticity
  • Epilepsy
  • Cachexia
  • Wasting Syndrome
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • PTSD

Delaware

2011 saw the state of Delaware make medical marijuana legal for the following medical problems:

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • ALS
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe Pain
  • Intractable nausea
  • Seizures
  • Persistent muscle spasms
  • PTSD

Florida

In 2016, it was legalized to use medical cannabis for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • ALS
  • PTSD
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • MS

Hawaii

Medical use of cannabis was legalized in Hawaii in 2000 for:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe pain
  • Severe nausea
  • Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms
  • PTSD

Illinois

A bill was passed in 2013 legalizing medical cannabis for:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Spinal cord disease
  • Tarlov cysts
  • Hydromyelia Syringomyelia
  • Rheumatoid Athritis
  • Fibrous Dysplasia
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Post concussion syndrome
  • MS
  • Arnold-Chiari Malformation
  • Syringomelia
  • SCA
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Tourettes
  • Myoclonus
  • Hystonia
  • RSD
  • Causalgia
  • CRPS
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
  • Sjogren’s Syndrome
  • Lupus
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Myasthenia Gravis
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Nail-Patella Syndrome
  • Residual limb pain
  • Terminal illness with less than 6 months to live

Maine

Medical marijuana was approved for use in 1999 for the following conditions:

  • Epilepsy/Seizures
  • Glaucoma
  • MS/muscle spasticity
  • Nausea due to chemotherapy or AIDS
  • PTSD
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Nail-Patella Syndrome
  • Intractable Pain
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome

Maryland

Medical marijuana was legalized in 2014 to treat:

  • Cachexia
  • Anorexia
  • Wasting Syndrome
  • Chronic and Severe Pain
  • Severe Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms

Massachusetts

Laws were passed in 2012 allowing the treatment of the following conditions with marijuana:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • MS

Michigan

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2008 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • ALS
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Nail Patella
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe and Chronic Pain-management
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Epilepsy
  • Muscle Spasms
  • MS
  • PTSD

Minnesota

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2014 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Tourette’s
  • ALS
  • Seizures
  • Epilepsy
  • Muscle Spasms/MS
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Terminal Illness with less than 1 year’s life expectancy
  • Intractable Pain

Medical marijuana may not be smoked in this state but must be taken by other methods.


Montana

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2004 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • ALS
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe and Chronic Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Epilepsy
  • Muscle Spasms
  • MS
  • PTSD
  • Peripheral Neuropathy

Nevada

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2000 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe and Chronic Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms
  • PTSD

New Hampshire

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2013 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • ALS
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Chronic pancreatitis
  • Spinal cord injury/disease
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Lupus
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe and Chronic Pain-management
  • Chemotherapy induced anorexia
  • Elevated intraocular pressure
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Epilepsy
  • Muscle Spasms
  • MS
  • PTSD

New Jersey

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2010 for the following conditions:

  • Terminal Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • ALS
  • Crohn’s Disease/Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe and Chronic Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Epilepsy
  • Muscle Spasms
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • MS
  • PTSD
  • Terminal Disease with a prognosis of under 12 months
  • Intractable Skeletal Spasticity

New Mexico

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2007 for the following conditions:

  • ALS
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Hospice Care
  • Inclusion Body Myostitis
  • Inflammatory Autoimmune Mediated Arthritis
  • Intractable Nausea/Vomiting
  • MS
  • Damage to Spinal Cord tissue
  • Painful peripheral neuropathy
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • PTSD
  • Severe Chronic Pain
  • Anorexia/Cachexia
  • SpasmodicTorticollis
  • Ulcerative Colitis

New York

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2014 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • ALS
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Spinal cord injury with spasticity
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Neuropathy
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe and Chronic Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms

North Dakota

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2016 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • ALS
  • PTSD
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Dementia
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Chronic Back Pain
  • Neuropathy
  • Spinal Cord Nervous Tissue Damage
  • Intractable Spasticity
  • Glaucoma
  • Epilepsy
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe Pain
  • Intractable Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms/MS

Ohio

Medical cannabis was legalized in 2016 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • ALS
  • Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • MS
  • Chronic Pain
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • PTSD
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Spinal Cord Injury/Disease
  • Tourette’s
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Ulcerative Colitis

Smoking of medical marijuana is not currently permitted but must be taken via other methods.


Oregon

Medical marijuana was approved for use in 1998 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • Degenerative neurological conditions
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cachexia
  • Severe Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures/Epilepsy
  • Muscle Spasms/MS
  • PTSD

Pennsylvania

Marijuana was approved for medical use in 2016 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • AIDS/HIV
  • ALS
  • Parkinson’s
  • MS
  • Spinal Cord tissue damage
  • Epilepsy
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Neuropathies
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • PTSD
  • Intractable Seizures
  • Glaucoma
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Neuropathic Pain
  • Severe/Chronic Pain
  • Autism

Smoking of marijuana is not legal however and therefore it must be taken via another method.


Rhode Island

In 2006, medical marijuana was approved for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
  • Severe Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Alzheimer’s Disease

Vermont

Medical marijuana was legalized in 2004 for the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • AIDS/HIV
  • MS
  • Cachexia/Wasting Sydrome
  • Severe Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures

Washington

Washington legalized medical marijuana in 1998 for the following conditions:

  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Intractable Pain
  • MS
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Hepatitis C
  • Anorexia
  • Nausea
  • Wasting
  • Weight loss
  • Cramping/Seizures
  • Muscle Spasms/Spasticity
  • Chronic renal failure

Washington DC

In 2010, medical marijuana was legalized in Washington DC for the following conditions:

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • Muscle Spasms/MS
  • Chemotherapy/Radiotherapy patients
  • Those using azidothymidine or protease inhibitors
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